What Are Our Christmas Lights? – 6 December 2009

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This is a question so many people who are invited to the Lights for the first time ask. Are they outside? Are they inside? Is it tacky? Is it stylish? What’s the point? Actually, that’s the main one. So I decided to tell you all what they are.

How did they start? When my dad was a lad, he bought Christmas lights and strung them together. Over time, this has grown and grown into the current format of a pre-timed show; set to music and narration.

Are they outside? No, they aren’t outside. A lot of it is made from paper and card; in addition to the Lego® electric motors. Should any of this get wet, the whole thing would fall to pieces. So, in reference to the question, they are inside.

Are they inside? Yes. The lights occupy the hall, stairs, and landing. Invited guests can come and view them from the landing, with the bulk of the show taking place in front of them.

Is it tacky, or tasteful and stylish? A lot of the illuminations have been collected over time; from Woolworths plastic Santas, to honeycomb paper bells. In that respect, a lot of the performance is tacky. But it is presented in a special, beautiful manor, and everyone who comes goes home remembering the show.

What’s the point? It’s just a thing my Dad does every year, for his own enjoyment and fun. But, we invite friends to come for a cake, coffee, or mince pie, and try to raise a bit of money for charity in the process.

PHOTO GALLERY of the 2008 Christmas Lights and Santa’s Grotto

Andrew Burdett

Andrew Burdett is a 20-year-old from Maidenhead in Berkshire. A self-professed "lover of life", he enjoys a busy calendar of activities and engagements. With regular involvement in the Scout Association and his church, he was made Head Boy in his final year at school. After a gap-year spent as a Teaching Assistant at a local junior school, he is now half-way through his Journalism Studies degree at the University of Sheffield. In his spare time, he swims, reads, and enjoys writing about himself in the third-person.